Benefits of Boarding your Dog vs. Hiring a Pet Sitter

You may have noticed the recent surge in popularity of at-home dog sitting for when pet owners are out of town or on vacation. Typically, a pet sitter or dog walker stops by 2 – 3 times per day in order to feed, exercise, and play with the pet. This post has been sponsored.

Benefits of Boarding your Dog vs. Hiring a Pet Sitter

As a pet owner, you may be wondering how pet sitting compares with boarding at a traditional boarding facility. The benefits of boarding your dog as opposed to hiring a pet sitter are discussed below.

Socialization

Boarding your dog at a kennel ensures that your pet receives important socialization with new humans and animals, which is crucial for the development of a well-rounded and well-behaved canine. When asking a pet sitter to come into your home, your dog misses out on opportunities to experience new sights, sounds, smells, people, and experiences that are important for your pet’s training.

Mental Stimulation

Dogs can become bored when left home alone for multiple hours throughout the day, leading them to find their own entertainment. A significant risk of leaving your dog in the hands of a dog sitter is that your pet will become bored if the sitter only checks in on him or her a couple times per day. When boarding your dog at a dedicated boarding facility, there is no chance that your pet can get into trouble in your home.

Exercise

How much exercise your dog receives depends on a variety of factors, but in general, a modern boarding facility will likely be able to offer your pet with just as much, if not more, exercise than when a pet sitter is hired. Depending on the kennel, some facilities will even put together individualized exercise plans that will ensure your dog’s exercise needs are met or exceeded each day.

Emergency

Oftentimes, pet sitters do not stay at your home for the entire day, but check in on your dog 2 – 3 times per day for exercise, feeding, and play time. This leaves your pet with plenty of time to get into trouble that goes undetected should an emergency occur. However, at a boarding facility your dog will be monitored 16 – 24 hours per day, depending on the facility. If an emergency were to arise, the chances of your pet receiving immediate care are much greater. For owners with multiple pets, the possibility of fights or injuries caused by unsupervised play is minimized when placed in the care of a kennel.

Fewer Worries

For anxious pet parents who have concerns about letting an unfamiliar person into their home, boarding at a kennel is a much preferred option. When your dog is being boarded you do not have to worry about potential loss or damage to your property, what would happen in case of an emergency, or whether your pet is feeling bored or lonely while you are away. In addition, the combined years of dog boarding and training experience that the staff at a boarding facility has is often far greater than that of a single pet sitter.

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Comments 8

  • We have someone stay at our house. Our dog doesn’t take well to other dogs and I don’t want him stuck in a cage all day. I wish he could play with other dogs….

  • In your article, you stated that a significant risk of leaving your dog in the hands of a dog sitter is that your pet will become bored if the sitter only checks in on him or her a couple times per day and when boarding your dog at a dedicated boarding facility, there is no chance that your pet can get into trouble in your home. My wife brought home a dog last week for my birthday and now we need a place to keep him while we go on our annual road trip. I wonder if most dog boarding schools accept any kind of dog or if there are breeds that they won’t accept.

    • Hi, Derek – In my experience, it really depends on the boarding school. Generally, it’s more about the behavior of the animal rather than the breed. If the dog is well controlled and follows instructions, a boarding school is likely to accept them. Of course, if a boarding school specializes in small/medium sized dogs and you stop by with a Great Dane, that may be an issue as well.

  • We always have someone come stay at our house when we’re away. Putting our pets in a boarding facility makes me so nervous! I figure that they’re more comfortable at home.

  • I’m glad you mention how a dog kennel allows your pet to socialize with new human and animals, which would help improve their development and behavior. In order to ensure they get the most help, you’d probably want to meet the staff and other animals so you can make sure your pet feels comfortable with them and will be properly taken care of. If you take your dog with you during this meeting, it could help you see how they interact with the staff and if they’re comfortable at the kennel.

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